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D23 



DoC, 



BIENNIAL REPORT 

OP THE 

State Industrial Farm Colony for 
Women 

KINSTON 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1938 



BIENNIAL REPORT 

OF THE 

State Industrial Farm Colony for 
Women 

KINSTON 




FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1938 



332 Biennial Report for 1936-37 — 1937-38 



PERSONNEL 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

(Terms expire June 4, 1939) 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, Chairman Kinston 

Mrs. G. V. Cowper, Secretary-Treasurer Kinston 

Miss Gertrude Weil Goldsboro 

Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor 

Ed. W. Summersill Jacksonville 



VISITING STAFF 

Thos. Leslie Lee, M.D., F.A.G.S Medical Director 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S Dentist 

RESIDENT EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Elsa Ernst Superintendent 

Helen Rollwage Budget Officer and Deputy 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 333 



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL 



To His Excellency, Clyde R. Hoey, Governor, 
and the General Assembly of North Carolina. 

Gentlemen : 

We have the honor of submitting, herewith, the report of the 
State Industrial Farm Colony for Women, for the biennial period 
dating from July 1, 1936, through June 30, 1938. 

Very truly yours, 

Rev. J. R. Rountree, 

Chairman 

Mrs. G. V. Cowper, 

Secretary- Treasurer 
of the Board of Directors. 



334 Biennial Report for 1936-37 — 1937-38 

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT 

To The Honorable Board of Directors of the 
State Industrial Farm Colony for Women: 

During the past biennium the work of the institution has 
gone steadily forward. There were 138 new cases admitted from 
the courts of the State, and 18 paroled persons were returned for 
further training. These admissions, together with 20 other ad- 
missions and the return of 2 escapees, brought the total num- 
ber of admissions up to 178 women. 

At the same time, hundreds of other women who could be- 
come assets instead of liabilities to their communities were, and 
are, still drifting in and out of the jails of the State annually, 
becoming for the most part more and more degraded individual- 
ly. Because the colony has no room for them, to give them the 
training which they need, they cannot be committed to us. 

We are sometimes asked how long is our "waiting list" at the 
Colony? Obviously, a correctional institution such as the Colony 
has no long waiting list. If there is no room for a woman at the 
Colony she is committed to the jail instead. The jails of the 
State of North Carolina are our "waiting lists," anfl will con- 
tinue to be so until additional dormitories are granted by the 
Legislature to enlarge the work of the Colony and care more 
adequately for the women misdemeanants of the State. 

The Colony has a turnover annually of approximately twice 
its average population. It has been proved beyond a doubt in 
the past seven years of work here that an unduly long training 
program is not necessary in order to rehabilitate the average 
woman misdemeanant, provided the program is comprehensively 
and efficiently planned and carried out under the direction of 
trained and skilled workers. We do not believe in institutionaliz- 
ing women. With an average daily population of slightly under 
50 women (this was the limit set by the last Legislature) the 
Colony during the past biennium has paroled 171 cases. These 
women were under training at the Colony for an average period 
of six to eight months. Out of the 171 women, 4 are at present 
back in the institution, having been returned for further train- 
ing. They are all four making good progress at the present time, 
and the prognosis for their future rehabilitation outside the in- 
stitution is favorable. 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 335 

Two women have died since leaving the Colony. Four others 
are now in the State Hospitals for the Insane, where they should 
have been sent directly in the first place instead of to the Colony. 
(Since the last Legislature we are permitted by law to refuse 
mentally deranged cases.) One seriously psychopathic case is now 
in the State Prison in Raleigh. 

Out of the remaining total of 160 cases there are 13 cases only 
that must for the present be definitely considered failures. Out 
of these 13 cases 12 are feeble-minded, 9 of them having the 
mentality of an eight year old child, and 3 the mentality of a 
nine year old child. Only one of the 13 is normal mentally, and 
she eventually should be capable of rehabilitation. 

In 19 cases the present adjustment is from fair to good, and 
in 113 cases the adjustment is from very good to excellent. 

There are 15 cases whose present whereabouts are not defi- 
nitely known. In 8 out of these 15 cases the prognosis was suffi- 
ciently good that we may assume from past experience with 
similar cases that a satisfactory adjustment is being made, and 
that these cases will presently come to light. This leaves 7 doubt- 
ful cases whose whereabouts are not known. 

We have, therefore, during the past biennium thus far ob- 
tained superior results in 66% of cases (113 out of 171 cases) 
and fair to good results in approximately 16% of cases (27 
cases). This gives us 82% of successful cases to date for the 
biennium. 

At the request of Governor Hoey and Mr. Edwin Gill, Com- 
missioner of Paroles, a complete survey is being made of over 
500 cases paroled from the Colony since its inception. This sur- 
vey is not yet completed, but as far as can be estimated at pres- 
ent, it will, in all probability, show between 70% and 80% of 
success for all cases admitted to the Colony. 

These statistics are submitted as evidence of the real contri- 
bution which the Colony is making to the improvement of the 
citizenry of the State. It is gratifying to the Superintendent 
that, so far as the Board has been concerned, they have always 
given the Colony program their fullest co-operation and assist- 
ance. My staff join me in expressing sincerest thanks for your 
help and encouragement. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Elsa Ernst, 
Superintendent. 



336 



Biennial Report for 1936-37 — 1937-38 



MEDICAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1937 and 1938 



YEARS ENDED 



June 30, 1937 June 30, 1938 



Admissions per year 

Complete physical examinations 

Wassermann examinations of admissions 

Additional Wassermann examinations (rechecks) 

Total Wassermann examinations 

Positive syphilitic cases 

Number of positive carried over from June 30, 1936 

Syphilitic treatments: 

Intravenous 

Intramuscular 

Total number of syphilitic treatments 

Number of Wassermanns negative on discharge 

Number of Wassermanns negative after treatment to June 30, 1938 but still in 

institution 

Gonorrheal examinations of admissions 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Additional gonorrheal examinations: 

Vaginal smears 

Urethral smears 

Total number of gonorrheal examinations 

Positive gonorrheal cases 

Gonorrheal vaccines 

Number of G. C. positive on discharge 

Number of G. C. negative on discharge 

Number of G. C. negative after treatment but still in institution 

Minor treatments 

Stool examinations 

Positive hookworm cases 

Hookworm treatments 

Thyroid treatments 

Clinical patients 

Regular visits made by doctor 

Emergency calls made by doctor 

Average number of patients seen each visit 

Major operations 

Minor operations.. .. : 

Hospitalizations 

Average weight on admission 

Average weight on dismissal 

Average weight of hookworm patients on admission 

Average weight of hookworm patients on dismissal (after treatments) 

Typhoid vaccinations 

Smallpox vaccinations 

Number of smallpox takes 

Infect ious diseases 



96 
92 
92 
206 
298 
24 
14 

277 
265 
542 



92 
92 
92 

252 
252 
344 
54 
585 



54 



2,312 
78 
16 
16 
1 
1,271 
51 
2 

25 

2 

4 

7 

125 

138 

118 

130 

261 

67 

14 



72 
72 
72 
164 
236 
20 



253 



473 
11 



72 

72 
72 

191 
191 
263 
29 
247 



22 

7 

,606 

59 

12 

12 

2 

956 

51 

2 

19 

3 

2 

5 

130 

145 

121 

134 

192 

58 

10 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 337 



REPORT OF MEDICAL DIRECTOR 

The above statistical report again bespeaks an unusually 
healthy institution. This is due, no doubt, to the policy of a com- 
plete examination of each inmate on admittance and to the cor- 
rection of minor ailments at this time. A very efficient resident 
nurse is in no small way responsible for this good report. There 
have been no epidemics at the institution for the past five years. 
The water supply is checked at regular intervals. At no time 
have harmful bacteria been reported. The kitchen, store rooms 
and dormitories have been inspected and at all times conform to 
sanitary requirements. 

The venereal situation in the class of women admitted to the 
institution remains about the same. The number of cases of 
gonorrhea and syphilis is about the same as for the last bien- 
nium. A noteworthy fact is that no inmate has been discharged 
from the institution with a positive Wassermann test or a posi- 
tive smear for gonorrhea. 

The medical director wishes to extend sincere thanks to the 
entire personnel of the institution for their cooperation during 
the past biennium. 

Thomas Leslie Lee, M.D. 



338 



Biennial Report for 1936-37—1937-38 



DENTAL STATISTICS 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1937 and 1938 




Number of admissions per year 

Number of dental examinations of admissions 

Number showing positive Vincent's infection 

Number negative for Vincent's infection after treatment. 

Number of Vincent's tests (rechecks) 

Total number of tests made for Vincent's infection 

Total number positives carried over from June 30, 1936.. 

Number of Vincent's treatments given 

Number positive, both syphilis and Vincent's angina 

Number of pyorrhea cases 

Number of cavities of decay 

Number of extractions 

Number of patients showing no cavities 

Number of partially erupted third molars . . 

Number of dental plates made — 

Total number of clinical patients 

Total number of visits by dentist 

Average number of patients seen each visit— 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 33& 



REPORT OF DENTIST 

Out of one hundred and sixty four new admissions examined 
during the past biennium, one hundred and seventeen, that is, 
seventy-one per cent, were positive for Vincent's infection. These 
cases were treated until negative. 

Re-checks are made on all inmates every two months. These 
re-checks include a microscopic smear for Vincent's infection, 
therefore the proposed addition of a microscope to the dental 
equipment will be a great aid in this respect. 

Individual instruction in the care of the teeth are given each 
inmate. A close follow-up of these instructions by members of 
the staff result in a marked improvement in the condition and 
care of the teeth of all women while in the institution. 

Geo. W. Price, D.D.S. 



340 



Biennial Report for 1936-37—1937-38 



TABLE NO. 1 
GENERAL INFORMATION 



Date of opening April 3, 1929 



2. Plant: 

Land— 488 acres (96 farmed) . 

Buildings 

Equipment 



.$ 4,880.00 
92,240.31 
13,311.61 



Total value $ 110,431.92 



YEARS ENDED 



1936-1937 



1937-1938 



3. Officers and employees in service at end of year: 

Superintendent 

Budget officer and secretary 

Nurse 

Dietitian 

Housemothers 

Farm teacher 

Laundry teacher 

Farm manager 

Farmhands 



Total. 



1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 



Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



341 



TABLE NO. 2 
MOVEMENT OF POPULATION 





YEARS ENDED 


PERSONS IN INSTITUTION 


June 30, 1937 


June 30, 1938 




64 


52 






Admissions during year: 


73 
12 

2 


65 




6 












9 


11 








96 


82 






Total number of persons taken care of in institution during year _ 


160 


134 






Separations during year: 


95 
1 
5 


76 








5 








7 


9 






Total separations from institution during year. . . 


108 


90 








52 


44 








61.09 
60 


47.84 




60 






MOVEMENT OF POPULATION BY CASES 






Total cases, first of year, both in institution and on parole .__ ._ 


187 
73 


194 


Number new cases committed to institution during year . 


65 






Total cases cared for during year _ ... . 


260 
66 


259 


Number of cases discharged during year 


52 






Total cases with institutional obligation , end of year 


194 


207 






SUMMARY 






In institution, end of year.. . _ . ... 


52 
142 


44 


On parole, end of year. 


153 






Total 


194 


207 







INDUSTRIAL FARM COLONY FOR WOMEN 
KINSTON 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



FOR THE TWO YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 1937 AND 1938 



344 



Biennial Report for 1936-37 — 1937-38 



Revenues and Expenditures 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT FUND 

For the Year Ended June 30, 1938 





Fiscal Year 
1937-1938 


Appropriation July 1, 1937 . _ 


REVENUES 


$ 7,000.00 
355.62 


Household and kitchen equipment . 


EXPENDITURES 








Balance appropriation June 30, 1938.. 


$ 6,644.38 







Revenues and Expenditures 

MAINTENANCE FUND 

For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1937 and 1938 





Fiscal Year 
1936-1937 


Fiscal Year 
1937-1938 


REVENUES 

Appropriation: 

Chapter 306 of P. L. 1935.. 


$ 23,425.00 


$ 27,299.00 


Chapter 99 of P. L. 1937... .. ... 




Institutional Receipts: 


67.24 


25.35- 


Transfer from 1936-1937 to 1937-1938 for ditching. . 


300.00 




316.90 


405.36 








$ 23,809.14 


$ 28,029.71 






EXPENDITURES 


$ 3,723.93 
14,067.62 
3,780.27 
1,725.49 


$ 3,864.15 




15,093.87 




3,824.20 




796.50 








$ 23,297.31 


$ 23,578.72 








$ 511.83 


$ 4,220.28 







Industrial Farm Colony for Women 



345- 



AVERAGE POPULATION AND MAINTENANCE PER CAPITA COST 
For the Two Years Ended June 30, 1937 and 1938 



Function 


Fiscal Year 
1936-1937 


Fiscal Year 
1937-1938 




60.96 

230.28 

61.88 

28.24 


80.77' 




315.51 




79.94 




16.65 






Total. . 


381.36 


492.87 








61.09 


47.84 







REPORT ON FARM PRODUCTION 





Year Ended 
June 30, 1937 


Year Ended 
June 30, 1938 


PRODUCTS USED AS FOOD 

Fruits: 

Strawberries 


205% gallons 

1,740 

1,373 

7 bushels 

49 bushels 
3 bushels 
12 bushels 




Cantaloupes .. 


723 


Watermelons ... ._ 


475 


Grapes .. . 




Vegetables: 

Beans — snap __. 


107 bushels 


Beans — lima 




Beets. 




Broccoli 




Cabbage... . 


3,618 pounds 
30 bushels 


9,388 pounds 


Carrots _ 


33 bushels 


Collards 


115 bushels 


Corn — green .. 


389 bushels 
67 bushels 
172 bushels 


117 bushels 


Cucumbers 




Greens ... _ 




Kale 




Lettuce .. . 




12 bushels 


Mustard . . 






Okra 


13 bushels 

19 bushels 

3 bushels 

33 bushels 




Onions 




Peas — garden ... . 




Peas— field .. ..... 




Peppers 




Potatoes — Irish . 


85 bushels 
67 bushels 
4 bushels 




Potatoes— sweet... .. 




Radishes. ._ 




Rutabagas ... 


29 bushels 


Squash 


26 bushels 

1 bushels 

243 bushels 




Spinach 




Tomatoes.. . 


110 bushels 


Turnip greens . .. . . 


39 bushels 


Turnips 


83 bushels 


95 bushels- 



346 



Biennial Report for 1936-37 — 1937-38 



REPORT ON FARM PRODUCTION— Continued 







Year Ended 
June 30, 1937 


. Year Ended 
June 30, 1938 


Eggs and Milk: 

Eggs 


PRODUCTS USED AS FOOD 


1,472 dozen 
2,601 gallons 


1,698 dozen 


Milk 


2,871 gallons 


Meat: 


86 pounds 


Pork (fresh) 


415 pounds 

3,400 pounds 

644 ponuds 


4,214 pounds 




1,941 pounds 




469 pounds 


Shortening: 

Butter 


70 pounds 






73 pounds 




PRODUCTS USED ON FARM 


760 bushels 
70 bushels 
15 tons 


538 bushels 




54 bushels 


Hay 


22 tons 




144 bushels 




71 bushels 
25 bushels 
10 bushels 
10 bushels 





















CANNING REPORT 





Year Ended 
June 30, 1937 


Year Ended 
June 30, 1938 


Fruits: 


100 gallons 

39 gallons 

5 gallons 




Watermelons ... 


11 gallons 








280 gallons 


Vegetables: 


26 gallons 
4 gallons 


441 gallons 








7 gallons 


■Cabbage 




555 gallons 


Carrots 


25 gallons 
70 gallons 
10 gallons 
277 gallons 
2 gallons 
22 gallons 
12 gallons 


45 gallons 


Corn . 


102 gallons 






Tomatoes 


290 gallons 




104 gallons 


Cucumber pickle 


120 gallons 






Turnips... 


212 gallons 








Total 


592 gallons 


2,167 gallons 








BRODART. INC 



Cat No 23 233 Printed inUSA